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Glenbuchat Heritage

22 Music in and around the Glen
The Glenbuchat Image Library
22 Music in and around the Glen

Music in the Glen

In my wanderings around the Internet searching information about Glenbuchat, I have been amazed on the amount of music that came from or related to the glen. The following are some examples and links to the tunes on the Internet. Wherever possible, I have placed a link to a sound file after the title of the music. Paste these into you browser and hear a sample of the tunes.

See page 22 in this section for details about Alexander Walker

GLENBUCKET CASTLE.
Scottish, Strathspey. C Minor. Standard. AB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Glenbucket Castle, or Glenbucket, was built in 1590 by John Gordone and Helen Carnagie on land between the Water of Bucket and the Don rivers. It was confiscated by the crown in 1745 due to Brigadier General Gordon's involvement in the Jacobite uprising of Bonnie Prince Charlie.
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GLENBUCKET LODGE. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard. AB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 174, pg. 60.
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GLENBUCKET'S BREEKS. Scottish, Strathspey. C Major. Standard. AAB. Gow (1817) notes: "Supposed to have been composed when it was rare to see Breeches worn in the Highlands." Source for notated version: "Communicated by Mr. McLeod of Rasay," who gave several tunes to Gow for his collections [Gow]. Gow (Complete Repository), Part 4, 1817; pg. 32.

GLENBUCHET'S REEL. Scottish, Reel. The melody appears in the Drummond Castle Manuscript (1734) in the possession of the Earl of Ancaster at Drummond Castle. It is inscribed "A Collection of the best Highland Reels written by David Young, W.M. & Accomptant."

CASTLE NEWE
A Major, Strathspey
Composed Alexander Walker
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COULL OF NEWE
D Major, Strathspey
Composed by Alexander Walker
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THE BRIDGE OF NEWE
E dorian, Strathspey
Composed by Alexander Walker
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MILL OF NEWE
E dorian, Strathspey
Composed by Alexander Walker
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LADY FORBES OF NEWE
A Major, reel
Composed Alexander Walker
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LADY FORBES OF NEW AND EDINGLASSIE.
Scottish, Air ("Moderately Slow, with Expression"). B Flat Major. Standard. AB. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833).
Moyra Cowie (The Life and Times of William Marshall, 1999) identifies Lady Forbes as Elizabeth, the daughter of Major John Cotgrave and the widow of William Ashburner. In 1800 she married Sir Charles Forbes, the 1st Baronet of Newe, Strathdon. The Castle of Newe, seat of the Forbes clan, was torn down in 1950 and the present clan chief, Sir Hamish Forbes, lives in a newly constructed dwelling.

BEN NEWE. Scottish, Reel. C Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1963; No. 65, pg. 23.
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BRAES OF NEWE, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. F Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 147, pg. 50.
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CHARLES JOHN FORBES of NEWE
http://jc.tzo.net/~jc/tmp/Tune14208.midi
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HOUSE OF BELLABEG, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. C Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 70, pg. 25.
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MR. G. IRONSIDE. BELLABEG. Scottish, Strathspey. E Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker in honor of Mr. G. Ironside of Bellabeg. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 119, pg. 41.

HOUSE OF GLENKINDY'S, THE. Scottish, Strathspey. G Major. Standard tuning. AB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 166, pg. 57.

CASTLE FORBES. Scottish, Strathspey. E Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Castle Forbes, overlooking the river Don in the northeast of Scotland, was commisioned in 1815 by the 18th Lord Forbes and was designed and built in the Georgian style by the famous architect John Smith. It is still occupied by the Forbes family.

DOUNE OF INVERNOUGHTY, THE. Scottish, Reel. E Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. The Doune of Invernoughty (or Invernochty) lies on the north bank of the River Don near the village of Strathdon. It is a fortified earthwork stronghold associated with the Earls of Mar, and features an impressive motte that dates to the late 12th and early 13th centuries. It is considered today on the finest earthwork castles surviving in Scotland
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BRIDGE OF BUCKET, THE. Scottish, Reel. A Major. Standard tuning (or ADae, a la Allie Bennett). AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 20, pg. 7. Allie Bennett – “Its About Time” (2004).
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ROYAL VISIT TO NEWE, 1859, THE. Scottish, Reel. F Sharp Minor. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by Alexander Walker, who was the gardener for the Forbes family at Castle Newe. Walker (A Collection of Strathspeys, Reels, Marches, &c.), 1866; No. 160, pg. 55.

ALEXANDER WALKER. Scottish, Reel. D Major. Standard tuning. AABB'. Composed by Alexander Walker. Walker, 1866; No. 90, pg. 31.
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MRS BREMNER, THE MANSE GLENBUCKET
Aka Miss Innes
E. Dorian Reel
Composed by Charles Grant
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Mr. Charles Grant was one of the best known of all the long race of schoolmasters. He was affectionately known as "schooley Grant" - born in Strondhu, Knockando 1807. He started in Aberlour in 1844 and taught, much of the time single handed, for the next 30 years. (Logbook 1874 - 87 pupils, 1 principle teacher - C. Grant AM.)
He was a man of varied accomplishments - a classical scholar (loved Horace) a musician - famed for his skill in composing fiddle music, Highland reels and Strathspeys. (His daughter had a private collection of his Strathspey and Reels some of which are incorporated in the books of the Scottish Country Dancing Society). He lived at the Schoolhouse (Glenmorag) and had a lovely garden which extended down to the school - now Victoria Terrace. He was a first class shot - good fisherman and knew every pool of the run of the Spey. He had a high reputation as a teacher and young men from other parishes came to finish under his able tuition. His daughter - wife of Dr. McPherson of Banff died 1957 - came frequently back to Aberlour and she had his fiddle music printed in book form (Grant's Strathspey & Reels).

ANGUS CAMERON'S COMPLIMENTS TO ALEX WEBSTER.
Scottish, Slow Air (6/8 time). D Minor. Standard. AAB. Composed by Angus Cameron. James Hunter relates that composer Cameron was a mathematics teacher in Kirriemuir, and the son of a famous fiddling family, all of whom were pupils of 'Dancie' Reid of Newtyle. The personage he composed the tune for was a gamekeeper at Glenbucket in Strathdon who become "intensely interested" in fiddle making, and who made some excellent instruments, one of which he had presented to Mr. Cameron. Hunter (Fiddle Music of Scotland), 1988; No. 41.

HOUSE OF CANDACRAIG, THE. Scottish, Air. A Major. Standard tuning. AAB. Composed by William Marshall (1748-1833). A Scottish fiddler and composer, Marshall is most famous for his many fine strathspeys. Marshall worked for much of his life for the Duke of Gordon as the Steward of his Household, and it is fortunate that the Duke was an enthusiastic supporter and patron of Marshall’s music. Candacraig House is located in the heart of Strathdon. It was the home of Catherine Gordon, an illegitimate child of the Duke of Gordon who was raised by the Duke at Gordon castle. Catherine married Captain John Anderson of Candacraig. Marshall, Fiddlecase Edition, 1978; 1822 Collection, pg. 18.
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William Marshall (1748 - 1833) of Fochabers in Morayshire, one of Scotland's greatest fiddler-composers. These include the 2-volume Collection of Strathspey Reels etc of 1781-1793, Marshall's Scottish Airs, Melodies etc. of 1822 and the 1845 posthumous collection, with other smaller publications. Of the 317 tunes, at least 37 are repeated, often with different titles and changes in the music, but in the interests of historical accuracy we have printed each Collection in its entirety, along with a table showing the repetitions.
The tunes represent just one facet of the talents of this remarkable man - athlete, dancer, astronomer, clockmaker, surveyor etc - described by Robert Burns as the first (ie finest) composer of strathspeys of the age.

G F ROSE OF AUCHERNACH
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From the memories of Kenneth McHardy, 'Memories of Strathdon School'

Empire Day on the 24th of May was also very important at this time when we would celebrate the glories of the British Empire. Colonel G.F. Rose of Auchernach House (now demolished) in Glen Nochty used to come to the School and give us a talk on the British Empire. Colonel Rose had been in the army in India and kept a white cockatoo. Interestingly the bird was not kept at Auchernach House but in the Tindall's home at the gate lodge. Colonel Rose would visit the bird and allegedly converse
with it in Urdu or some such language.

G.F. Rose, a farmer in Strathdon, Aberdeenshire, was both a great friend of George S Mclennan and also a very able piper. Indeed GS admired him so much that he composed this lovely, simple march in his honour.

George S. McLennan 1883 - 1929
Aberdeen, Scotland. G. S. McLennan came from a piping family who could trace their roots to 16th century pipers, and included a piper at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. G. S. McLennan was also a gifted and prolific composer of bagpipe tunes. Those who heard him say his fingers were miraculous. His astonishing technical prowess contributed to an important evolution in Highland pipe technique in the early part of the twentieth century. As a composer, the quality and lasting appeal of his tunes are unequalled. As a person he was modest, generous and well-liked by his peers. But on the strength of his light music playing alone his name would almost certainly be included in lists of the top three pipers ever.

JOHN OF BADENYON
48 bar Strathspey for 4 Couples.
Music: John of Badenyon arranged by Peter White
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JOHN OF BADENYON
In the file HAYDN.abc from Seymour Shlien
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Haydn wrote arrangements of Scottish folk songs, mostly for voice and piano trio, for several publishers between 1791 and about 1805; these discs contain those he wrote for the Scottish publisher George Thomson. These recordings do contain some music that has probably never been recorded before; in addition to folk song arrangements, there are a few delightful little sets of instrumental variations on Scottish songs. Some of the music in this set would have been among the last that Haydn set down in his old age.

DRUMNAGARRY (Drumnagarrow) or Fishers Rant
Scott Skinner/Jamie Hardy
Fiddle Tune
G major, Strathspey
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Parody of Drumgarry
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Skinner has adapted a previous printed version by adding another title, the composer's name, changing the bowing, adding dynamics, and a simple bass line. 'Drumnagarry', was John Strachan (c.1785-1877) b. Drumnagarrow, Glenbuchat, Aberdeenshire. He was a well-known fiddler who sometimes played with Willie Blair (q.v.). The 'Fisher's Rant' was renamed 'Drumnagarry' after Strachan. His daughter Mary married William Hardie of Methlick, grandfather of Aberdeenshire fiddler William J. Hardie (1927-1988) and great-grandfather of Edinburgh-based fiddler and publisher Alastair J. Hardie (b. Aberdeen). The composer, 'J. Hardy' was probably James (or Jamie) Hardie (1836-1916, b. nr Ellon, Aberdeenshire d. Edinburgh), a successful Edinburgh violin-maker whom Skinner often visited. Hardie, a grandson of Strachan's, was a prize-winning fiddler, and also played the double bass.

JAMIE HARDIE REEL
Scott Skinner
Fidle tune
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Manuscript in Skinner's hand of 'Reel - 'Jamie Hardie'* - 1st time published / J. Scott Skinner. * Brother of the late Charles Hardie (and descendant of the once famous Drumnagarrow (John Strachan) (see JSS0101, JSS0102). Reel to follow 'Bob Steele'. (Bob Steele, JSS0092, is called Johnie Steele in the Harp and Claymore.) The bass line differs in the published version, although it remains simple. The dynamic f (loud) and is added to the first bar of the second section, and ff (very loud) replaces 'with force', in the next last bar.

James Scott Skinner. Doyen of Scottish fiddle composers and in his work will be found the influence of all the great composers who preceded him such as the Gows, Marshall, Walker, Peter Milne and his brother Sandy Skinner, but James Scott Skinner’s compositions and arrangements are very much those of The King as he was styled by an enthusiastic public. A marvellous player, he wrote for fiddlers who could really play. James Skinner was born in Banchory in 1833 but he left there when he was seven to live in Aberdeen and attend school in Frederick Street. When he was six he was playing in a band that contained his brother, Sandy, and Peter Milne, The Tarland Minstrel. His brother took him to the Music Hall in Aberdeen to audition for a famous juvenile orchestra, Dr. Mark’s Little Men. Skinner went off with the group to Manchester where he received tuition from Charles Rougier who was astounded to discover Skinner could not read music! Rougier soon rectified this and Skinner prospered under his tuition and eventually he ran away from Dr. Mark’s troup to return to Aberdeen. He took dancing lessons from ‘Professor’ William Scott of Stoneywood and in admiration of his tutor added ‘Scott’ to his own name. Skinner set himself up as a teacher of dancing and music and never looked back.

He won various prizes for dancing and at 19 years of age won the Scottish Fiddle Championship at Inverness. He was engaged by Queen Victoria to teach dancing to the employees of the Royal estates and his concert appearances drew large appreciative audiences. As a composer he had few equals and his work is still played worldwide and every fiddle ensemble includes his work in their repertoire. Skinner died in 1927 and was buried at Allenvale Cemetery, Aberdeen. Skinner wrote some 600 tunes and among his most popular are The Bonnie Lass o Bon Accord; The Cradle Song; The Flower o the Quern; The Laird o Drumblair; The Miller o Hirn; Our Highland Queen; The Cameron Highlanders; Bonnie Banchory; Tulchan Lodge and The Laird o Thrums



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23 Alexander Walker Fiddle Musc Composer1 G F Rose of Auchernach Introduction18 John o'Badenyon Music and Poem6 Drumgarrow Scott Skiner Reel Jamie Hardie5 Drumnagarrow Scott Skinner